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Märklin 2008 New Items: H0 Steam Engines

Prices do not include shipping from ToToTrains to you. Applicable taxes apply.

ToToTrains is not liable for typo's, or any change in price or delivery due to the manufacturers decision(s).

Prices are good through February 28, 2008 only!

 

Märklin H0: 36240 Steam Engine

Prototype: German Federal Railroad (DB) class 24 general-purpose locomotive. Standard design locomotive with Wagner smoke deflectors.

Model: The locomotive has a digital decoder and a special motor. The boiler is constructed of metal. All driving axles powered. 2 traction tires. The locomotive has close couplers in NEM coupler pockets. The triple headlights change over with the direction of travel, will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. The headlights are maintenance-free LED's. The acceleration and braking delay can be controlled digitally with a 6021 Control Unit or Märklin Systems. The locomotive has a smoke generator contact: It is ready for installation of a smoke generator. Length over the buffers 19.4 cm / 7-5/8".

Highlights:New tooling.
Detailed, affordable beginner's model.
Built-in digital decoder.
Smoke generator contact.

Class 24 – Prairie Pony in Prussia. Between 1926 and 1938, a total of 95 units of the class 24 were purchased for the flat, long branch lines in East and West Prussia. These locomotives were nicknamed the "Prairie Pony" and were designed as a passenger locomotive, but were soon used as a general-purpose locomotive. This 16.96 meter / 55 foot 7-11/16 inch long locomotive reached a maximum speed of 90 km/h / 56 mph. It was a parallel class to the class 64 and gave very good results in the tasks assigned to it. The division of Germany and the areas surrendered to Poland resulted in 38 units finally coming to the German Federal Railroad, where they continued to perform valuable service on branch lines, often with "Donnerbüchsen / Thunder Box" passenger cars. Gradually, they were replaced in many locations by the class VT 95 and VT 98 red rail busses, were retired and scrapped. They last home base was Rheydt; there they left regular service in 1966 on the German Federal Railroad. In Poland the 34 locomotives left there after World War II were indispensable up to 1976. Four Prairie Ponies remain preserved as museum pieces; one of them is from the roster of the Polish State Railroad (PKB).

Price: $169.00

 

 

Märklin H0: 37033 Steam Locomotive with a Tender

Prototype: Belgian State Railways (NMBS/SNCB) class 64 passenger locomotive. Former Prussian P 8. Typical Belgian rebuilt version. The locomotive looks as it did in Era III.

Model: The locomotive has an mfx digital decoder, controlled high-efficiency propulsion, and a sound effects generator. It has a powerful motor with a bell-shaped armature, built into the boiler. 3 axles powered. 2 traction tires. A 72270 smoke generator can be installed in the locomotive. The headlights are maintenance-free, warm white LED's. They and the smoke generator contact will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. Steam locomotive operating sounds, a locomotive whistle sound, and the acceleration and braking delay can be controlled with a 6021 Control Unit or with Märklin Systems. Additional operating sounds can be controlled with Märklin Systems. There is a close coupling between the locomotive and the tender. The engineer's cab is detailed. Brake hoses, prototypical couplers, and cylinder rod protection sleeves can be installed on the locomotive. Length over the buffers 21.0 cm / 8-1/4".

Highlights:
Prototypical Belgian headlights.
Maintenance-free, warm white LED's.
Steam locomotive sounds.
One-time series.

This model goes very well with the compartment cars available under item no. 42045.

Price: $469.00

 

 

Märklin H0: 37054 Steam Locomotive with a Tender

Prototype: German State Railroad Company (DRG) class 59 freight locomotive. Former Royal Württemberg State Railways (K.W.St.E.) class K. Road no. 59 004 from photos by Carl Bellingrodt.

Model: The locomotive has an mfx digital decoder, controlled propulsion, and a sound generator. It also has a powerful motor with a bell-shaped armature, built-into the boiler. The locomotive has a frame with axles with side play for negotiating sharp curves. 6 axles powered. 4 traction tires. There is an adjustable close coupling between the locomotive and the tender. The locomotive has a detailed engineer's cab, and a figure of a locomotive engineer and a fireman are included. The locomotive has free-standing lamps with built-in LED's. A 7226 smoke generator can be installed in the locomotive. The headlights and the smoke generator contact will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. Steam locomotive operating sounds, a whistle sound, and the acceleration and braking delay can be controlled digitally with a 6021 Control Unit or with Märklin Systems. Additional sound functions can be controlled digitally with Märklin Systems. Brake hoses and prototypical couplers can be installed on the buffer beam. Length over the buffers 23.5 cm / 9-1/4". A suitable collector's display case made of wood and glass comes with the locomotive, and a reproduction of a photo by the Master of a prototype serves as a backdrop for the case.

Highlights:
"Carl Bellingrodt Edition 3".
Suitable collector's display case for each model in the edition.
Controlled high-efficiency propulsion with a can motor with a bell-shaped armature.
Light function: headlights.
Sound functions: steam locomotive operating sounds, whistle, bell, brakes, air, steam, coal...
Super detailing.
One-time edition in a limited series (model 3 of 5).

In Honor of the Old Master - Carl Bellingrodt, born April 7, 1897 in Cologne, was undoubtedly one of the most famous German railroad photographers. He began to photograph various subjects as early as before World War I, but soon specialized in landscapes and above all railroad photography. Although he was a government official and pursued photography as a hobby, he amassed more than 30,000 images over the course of his activity, and many of them rank among the classic masterpieces. In addition to his systematically generated groups of images of entire classes of locomotives, his images of the railroad in a landscape as well as his extremely dense photographs of stations with their typical environment achieved near cult status. In this manner Carl Bellingrodt set the style for many other railroad photographers, many of whom still make the pilgrimage to the beloved "Bellingrodt photography sites" in order to photograph the trains of our time in the classic perspective of the old master. Märklin is issuing a special five-part series of sought after H0 models in memory of this railroad photograph pioneer, who died on September 24, 1971 in Wuppertal and who will certainly live on in the memory of many people for a long time. One locomotive per year will be produced as a limited series in exquisite detailing and with premium technical features. Each of these models will be delivered with a decorated display case with the Bellingrodt photograph of the locomotive in question mounted on the back wall of the case. In front of this in the lower part of the case is a glass display floor on which the model can be attractively presented. This will allow a direct comparison between the Bellingrodt photograph of the prototype locomotive and the exquisite reproduction as a model. The glass front wall offers effective protection against dust.

Price: $775.00

 

 

Märklin H0: 37075 Tank Locomotive

Prototype: French State Railways (SNCF) class 232 TC fast passenger locomotive.

Model: The locomotive has an mfx digital decoder and controlled high-efficiency propulsion. 3 axles powered. 2 traction tires. The headlights will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. The acceleration and braking delay can be controlled digitally with a 6021 Control Unit or with Märklin Systems. The locomotive has numerous separately applied details. Length over the buffers 16.9 cm / 6-5/8".

One-time series.

The model of the class 232 TC is the ideal motive power for the compartment car set, item no. 42040.

Price: $329.00

 

 

Märklin H0: 37142 Tank Locomotive

Prototype: Museo Ferroviario Piemontese / Piedmont Railroad Museum locomotive no. 3. Former Ferrovia Val Sessera / Sessera Valley Railroad (FVS) locomotive no. 2. Built in 1907 by Henschel as a Prussian class T 3. The locomotive looks as it did when restored to its paint and lettering scheme in 1935. Use: Special excursions.

Model: The locomotive has an mfx digital decoder and controlled propulsion. There is a miniature can motor in the boiler. 3 axles powered. Traction tires. The locomotive has detailed running gear and a representation of the Allan valve gear. The headlights are maintenance-free, warm white LED's. The headlights will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. The acceleration and braking delay can be controlled digitally with a 6021 Control Unit or with Märklin Systems. There is an open view through the engineer's cab. The locomotive has many separately applied details. Length over the buffers 9.9 cm / 3-7/8".

One-time series.

In 1882, Henschel delivered the first example of a saturated steam locomotive with 6 driving wheels for branch line service. The T 3 impressed people with its easy maintenance, robustness and versatility. The jury at the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893 was also convinced. It awarded a prize to this 11 year old design. Even 13 years later locomotive builders were still bold enough to exhibit the T 3. In Milan, Hanomag presented the last locomotive, equipped with a Lentz poppet valve system as an experiment. The exhibition efforts paid off for the companies involved. Locomotives of similar design went to China, France, Greece, and Italy. The German State Railroad designated it the class 89.70. In Germany, in addition to the Prussian State Railways, numerous private railroads purchased the T 3.

Price: $279.00

 

 

Märklin H0: 37187 Set with 2 "S 3/6" Steam Locomotives with Tenders.

Prototype: 2 Bavarian design Pacific express locomotives. Original version of the Royal Bavarian State Railroad (K.Bay.Sts.B.) in a provincial railroad paint scheme. Postwar version of the German Federal Railroad (DB) class 18.4 with smoke deflectors in the standard red / black paint scheme.

Model: Both locomotives have digital decoders and controlled high-efficiency propulsion. 3 axles powered. Traction tires. The 72270 smoke generator can be installed in the locomotives. The headlights and the smoke generator contact will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. The acceleration and braking delay can be controlled with a 6021 Control Unit or with Märklin Systems. The metal locomotive frames are partially open with separately applied details. Length over the buffers for each locomotive 24.9 cm / 9-13/16".

Highlights:
An attractive pair: the beautiful S 3/6 from two eras.
Locomotive frames and bodies constructed of metal.
Digital decoders and high-efficiency propulsion included.
One-time series.

Each locomotive comes individually packaged.

Price: $445.00

 

 


Märklin H0: 37848 Steam Engine with Tender

Prototype: German Federal Railroad (DB) class 50 freight locomotive. Version with a box-style tender and Wagner smoke deflectors. The locomotive looks as it did around 1954.

Model: The locomotive has an mfx digital decoder, controlled high-efficiency propulsion, a Telex coupler on the tender, and a sound effects generator. The motor is in the boiler. 5 axles powered. Traction tires. The locomotive's frame is articulated to enable the locomotive to negotiate sharp curves. The headlights will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. A 7226 smoke generator can be installed in the locomotive. The smoke generator contact, the Telex coupler, the steam locomotive whistle sound, and the acceleration and braking delay can be controlled with a 6021 Control Unit or with Märklin Systems. Additional operating sounds can be controlled with Märklin Systems. There is an NEM coupler pocket on the pilot truck. The close coupling between the locomotive and the tender is adjustable. Length over the buffers 26.3 / 26.5 cm / 10-3/8" / 10-7/16".

Highlights:
Motor and gear drive in the locomotive, decoder in the tender.
Special articulated running gear.
Telex coupler on the tender for remote-controlled uncoupling from cars.
Realistic steam locomotive sounds.

Price: $475.00

 

 


Märklin H0: 37887 Locomotive with a Tender and a Crew Car

Prototype: French State Railways (SNCF) class 150 X heavy freight locomotive. Former German class 44. 1 Prussian design (Cs) crew car for the 2nd locomotive crew. The units look as they did around 1946.

Model: The locomotive has an mfx digital decoder, controlled high-efficiency propulsion, a Telex coupler on the tender, and a sound effects circuit with many functions. 5 axles powered. 4 traction tires. The locomotive has an articulated frame to enable the unit to negotiate sharp curves. A 7226 smoke generator can be installed in the locomotive. The headlights will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. The smoke generator contact, the Telex coupler, the steam locomotive operating sounds, and the acceleration and braking delay can be controlled digitally with a 6021 Control Unit or with Märklin Systems. Other operating sounds can be controlled digitally with Märklin Systems. There is an adjustable close coupling between the locomotive and the tender. There is an NEM-like coupler pocket on the front of the locomotive. Cylinder rod protection sleeves can be installed on the locomotive. Length over the buffers 26.0 mm / 26.2 cm / 10-1/4" / 10-5/16". The compartment car (crew car) has a brakeman's cab. The ladders and grab irons are separately applied. Length over the buffers 13.8 cm / 5-7/16".

One-time series.

The French coal beds in Lorraine ensured the supply of energy for Paris for many years and particularly in the immediate postwar period. Very heavy coal trains went daily from the mines to the capital city. A second locomotive crew rode in a crew car specially set up for the purpose so that the relatively long route could be traversed as quickly as possible without long intermediate stops. The crew car for the second crew was a so-called "camping car" and the second crew could spell the first crew during the run. At the end of the Forties, the coal cars consisted of all kinds of different designs of two-axle gondolas.

Cars with coal loads to go with this locomotive can be found under item no. 46092.

This model can be found in a DC version in the Trix H0 assortment under item no. 22147.

Price: $499.00

 

 

Märklin H0: 37966 Tank Locomotive

Prototype: German State Railroad Company (DRG) class 96 heavy freight locomotive. Former Bavarian Gt 2x4/4. 0-8-8-0T wheel arrangement (Mallet design). Built starting in 1913. Use: Freight trains and pusher service on steep grades.

Model: The locomotive has an mfx digital decoder, controlled high-efficiency propulsion and a sound effects generator with many functions. 4 axles powered. 4 traction tires. The locomotive has an articulated frame to enable it to negotiate sharp curves. The headlights will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. Steam locomotive operating sounds, a whistle sound, and the acceleration and braking delay can be controlled digitally with a 6021 Control Unit or Märklin Systems. Other operating sounds can be controlled digitally with Märklin Systems. The locomotive has numerous separately applied details. Length over the buffers 20.3 cm / 8".

Price: $499.00

 

 

Märklin H0: 37975 Steam Locomotive with a Tender

Prototype: Royal Bavarian State Railroad (K.Bay.Sts.B.) class B VI old-timer locomotive. Version for peat firing, but without a high sided peat tender. Locomotive name "Orlando di Lasso" on the nameplate.

Model: The locomotive has an mfx digital decoder, controlled, high-efficiency propulsion and a sound generator with many functions. There is a powerful can motor with a bell-shaped armature in the locomotive's boiler. 2 axles powered. 2 traction tires. The locomotive has detailed running gear with an external frame and Stephenson valve gear. The headlights will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. Steam locomotive operating sounds that vary with the speed of the locomotive, a whistle sound, and the acceleration and braking delay can be controlled digitally with a 6021 Control Unit or Märklin Systems. Other operating sounds can be controlled digitally with Märklin Systems. There is a close coupling between the locomotive and the tender. Brake hoses and prototypical couplers can be installed on the buffer beam. Length over the buffers 16.3 cm / 6-7/16". The locomotive comes packaged in a decorative wooden box.

One-time series.

Maffei delivered 107 locomotives with four driving wheels and a single-axle pilot truck to the Bavarian State Railways between 1863 and 1871. Technically, the B VI differed only slightly from the predecessor class, the B V. The driving wheel diameter was increased from 1,462 mm / 57-9/16" to 1,616 mm / 63-5/8" and the service weight went up one metric ton to 31 tons. Likes its predecessor, the B VI could be fired with coal as well as with peat. After the installation of replacement boilers, the permissible steam pressure went from 116 to 145 pounds per square inch. The B VI was used primarily to pull passenger trains in regular service. It was soon demoted by faster locomotives to less important service. The B VI began to be pulled from service as early as 1895 and this process went on into the Twenties. Two units active in maintenance train service survived into the temporary numbering system for the German State Railroad as road numbers 34 7461 and 34 7362, and they were soon retired after the new numbering system took effect in 1925. One unit, 34 316, wrote railroad history. This locomotive bore the name "Tristan" and pulled the Royal Court Train for Ludwig II, when his Majesty went on a trip.

Cars to go with the "Orlando di Lasso" can be found under item no. 43985.

This model can be found in a DC version in the Trix H0 assortment under item no. 22184.

Price: $549.00

 

 

Märklin H0: 39011 Express Steam Locomotive with a Tender

Prototype: German State Railroad Company (DRG) class 01 steam locomotive. Locomotive as it looked at the end of the Thirties with Wagner smoke deflectors.

Model: The locomotive has an mfx digital decoder and a sound effects generator. It also has controlled Softdrive Sine high efficiency propulsion and a compact design, maintenance-free motor. 3 axles powered. 2 traction tires. The locomotive and tender are constructed mostly of metal. There is an adjustable close coupling between the locomotive and tender for different radius curves. The 7226 smoke generator can be installed in the locomotive. The lighting is maintenance-free, warm white LED's. The dual headlights change over with the direction of travel. They and the smoke generator that can be installed in the locomotive will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. The locomotive whistle sound and the steam locomotive operating sounds as well as the acceleration and braking delay can be controlled with a 6021 Control Unit or with Märklin Systems. The sound of the air compressor working, a flickering firebox light, the sound of brakes squealing, and a short whistle blast for switching can be controlled with Märklin Systems. Three additional sound functions (steam being let off, coal being shoveled, and the grate being shaken) can be turned on with the 60212 Central Station. There is a close coupler with a guide mechanism and an NEM coupler pocket on the back of the tender. Minimum radius for operation 360 mm / 14-3/16". Length over the buffers 27.5 cm / 10-13/16".

This model can be found in a DC version in the Trix assortment under item no. 22028.

Price: $499.00

 

 

Märklin H0: 39020 Express Locomotive with a Tender

Prototype: German State Railroad Company (DRG) class 18.3 steam locomotive, 4-6-2 wheel arrangement. Built starting in 1918 as the class IV h for the Grand Ducal Baden State Railways. Use: Premium passenger service.

Model: The locomotive has controlled, compact design, high-efficiency Softdrive Sine propulsion with an mfx digital decoder and a sound generator. 3 axles powered. 2 traction tires. The tender is constructed of metal. There is a close coupling between the locomotive and tender that can be adjusted for the radius of your curved track. A 72270 smoke generator can be installed in the locomotive. The LED triple headlights change over with the direction of travel. They and the smoke generator that can be installed in the locomotive will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. The acceleration and braking delay, the locomotive whistle sound, and steam locomotive operating sounds, the sound of the compressor working, the flickering light in the fire box, the sound of brakes squealing, and a short whistle blast for switching maneuvers can be controlled with a 6021 Control Unit or Märklin Systems. Three additional sound functions (the sound of steam being let off, the sound of coal being shoveled, and the sound of the grate being shaken) can be controlled with the 60212 Central Station. There is a close coupler with an NEM pocket and a guide mechanism on the tender. Minimum radius for operation 360 mm / 14-3/16". Length over the buffers 26.7 cm / 10-1/2".

Highlights:
Completely new tooling.
Especially filigree metal construction.
High-efficiency propulsion with a control feature and adjustable running characteristics.
Operating sounds that vary with the speed and that are synchronized with the wheels' rotation.
Steam whistle sound.
Flickering of the glowing light in the firebox synchronized with the locomotive exhaust.

Baden IV h – The Complicated Beauty. In 1915, the Grand Ducal Baden State Railways order 20 locomotives with a 4-6-2 wheel arrangement (Pacific) from Maffei in Munich in order to operate the Rhine Valley line more efficiently. This locomotive type was designated as the IV h and was planned mainly for use between Mannheim and Basle. The design was therefore laid out purely as an express locomotive for flat terrain. The driving wheel diameter of 2,100 mm / 82-11/16" was exceeded only by road no. 18 201 of the German State Railroad Company for a locomotive of its wheel arrangement. The maximum speed was set at 110 km/h / 69 mph however due to the brake technology of the time. Due to the events of World War I, this locomotive was built in 3 series from 1918 to 1920. When the last class IV h locomotives were delivered by the builder in 1920, the Baden State Railways were already incorporated into the German State Railroad, which took all 20 locomotives into its roster as the class 18.3. These units were stationed at the maintenance facility in Offenburg and were the flagship express locomotive on the Rhine Valley line. They could often be seen pulling the German State Railroad's new luxury train, the Rheingold. Maffei designed four-cylinder compound running gear for the IV h, whose inner cylinders were positioned far to the front and gave the locomotive its unmistakable look. Although the boiler for the class IV h was the largest of its time in Germany, its reserves were not all that great, and the water volume was relatively small. The super heater surface was also small in dimension such that the steam could only reach a temperature of 330° Celsius / 626° Fahrenheit. These facts made the water and coal consumption rather high and were considerably greater than that of the later German State Railroad Company standard design locomotives. The tender also contributed to the characteristic look of the locomotive. It was unusually short with a truck and with two axles mounted close to one another in the frame of the tender. During its service life, the Baden IV h was not very popular with either the locomotive crews or the railroad's managers because of its complicated technology, and it was replaced relatively quickly by the new standard design 01. It was transferred in groups to North Germany until all 20 locomotives were stationed in Bremen in 1942. They were used primarily in the area of the North German flatlands, an area they were best suited for, and where the new locomotive crews could better get use to the complicated system of compound high and low pressure cylinders. The maximum speed for these locomotives was increased to 140 km/h / 88 mph after the installation of stronger brakes, and the performance of the class 18.3 left many newer express locomotives in the dust. Except for one unit, all of the class 18.3 locomotives survived World War II. The new German Federal Railroad had no use for them and they were retired. With the reconstruction of the infrastructure and the normalization of the rail service, the need for fast experimental locomotives grew, and the German Federal Railroad was forced to overhaul three of the stored class 18.3 locomotives. These locomotives were modified accordingly and gave many years of valuable service for the Locomotive Experimental Bureau in Minden. Road no. 18 316 reached the speed of 162 km/h / 101 mph during a test run in Austria on the line from Kufstein to Wörgl and became the fastest provincial railroad locomotive. The last two locomotives were stored in 1969 and these beautiful units remain preserved as monuments for the provincial railroad era.

This model can be found in a DC version in the Trix H0 assortment under item no. 22180.

Price: $499.00

 

 

Märklin H0: 39025 Express Locomotive with a Tender

Prototype: German State Railroad Company (DRG) class 18.3 steam locomotive, 4-6-2 wheel arrangement. Built starting in 1918 as the class IVh for the Grand Ducal Baden State Railways. Use: Premium passenger service.

Model: The locomotive has controlled, compact design, high-efficiency Softdrive Sine propulsion with an mfx digital decoder without a sound generator. 3 axles powered. 2 traction tires. The tender is constructed of metal. There is a close coupling between the locomotive and tender that can be adjusted for the radius of your curved track. A 72270 smoke generator can be installed in the locomotive. The LED dual headlights change over with the direction of travel. They and the smoke generator that can be installed in the locomotive will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. The acceleration and braking delay and the flickering light in the fire box can be controlled with a 6021 Control Unit or Märklin Systems. There is a close coupler with an NEM pocket and a guide mechanism on the tender. Minimum radius for operation 360 mm / 14-3/16". Length over the buffers 26.7 cm / 10-1/2".

Highlights:
Completely new tooling.
Especially filigree metal construction.
High-efficiency propulsion with a control feature and adjustable running characteristics.
Flickering of the glowing light in the firebox synchronized with the locomotive exhaust.

Baden IV h – The Complicated Beauty. In 1915, the Grand Ducal Baden State Railways order 20 locomotives with a 4-6-2 wheel arrangement (Pacific) from Maffei in Munich in order to operate the Rhine Valley line more efficiently. This locomotive type was designated as the IV h and was planned mainly for use between Mannheim and Basle. The design was therefore laid out purely as an express locomotive for flat terrain. The driving wheel diameter of 2,100 mm / 82-11/16" was exceeded only by road no. 18 201 of the German State Railroad Company for a locomotive of its wheel arrangement. The maximum speed was set at 110 km/h / 69 mph however due to the brake technology of the time. Due to the events of World War I, this locomotive was built in 3 series from 1918 to 1920. When the last class IV h locomotives were delivered by the builder in 1920, the Baden State Railways were already incorporated into the German State Railroad, which took all 20 locomotives into its roster as the class 18.3. These units were stationed at the maintenance facility in Offenburg and were the flagship express locomotive on the Rhine Valley line. They could often be seen pulling the German State Railroad's new luxury train, the Rheingold. Maffei designed four-cylinder compound running gear for the IV h, whose inner cylinders were positioned far to the front and gave the locomotive its unmistakable look. Although the boiler for the class IV h was the largest of its time in Germany, its reserves were not all that great, and the water volume was relatively small. The super heater surface was also small in dimension such that the steam could only reach a temperature of 330° Celsius / 626° Fahrenheit. These facts made the water and coal consumption rather high and were considerably greater than that of the later German State Railroad Company standard design locomotives. The tender also contributed to the characteristic look of the locomotive. It was unusually short with a truck and with two axles mounted close to one another in the frame of the tender. During its service life, the Baden IV h was not very popular with either the locomotive crews or the railroad's managers because of its complicated technology, and it was replaced relatively quickly by the new standard design 01. It was transferred in groups to North Germany until all 20 locomotives were stationed in Bremen in 1942. They were used primarily in the area of the North German flatlands, an area they were best suited for, and where the new locomotive crews could better get use to the complicated system of compound high and low pressure cylinders. The maximum speed for these locomotives was increased to 140 km/h / 88 mph after the installation of stronger brakes, and the performance of the class 18.3 left many newer express locomotives in the dust. Except for one unit, all of the class 18.3 locomotives survived World War II. The new German Federal Railroad had no use for them and they were retired. With the reconstruction of the infrastructure and the normalization of the rail service, the need for fast experimental locomotives grew, and the German Federal Railroad was forced to overhaul three of the stored class 18.3 locomotives. These locomotives were modified accordingly and gave many years of valuable service for the Locomotive Experimental Bureau in Minden. Road no. 18 316 reached the speed of 162 km/h / 101 mph during a test run in Austria on the line from Kufstein to Wörgl and became the fastest provincial railroad locomotive. The last two locomotives were stored in 1969 and these beautiful units remain preserved as monuments for the provincial railroad era.

This model can be found in a DC version in the Trix H0 assortment under item no. 22181.

Price: $435.00

 

 

Märklin H0: 39640 Tank Locomotive

Prototype: German Federal Railroad (DB) class 64 steam locomotive. The locomotive looks as it did around 1967.

Model: The locomotive has an mfx digital decoder, controlled Softdrive Sine high-efficiency propulsion, and a sound effects generator. It also has a compact design, maintenance-free motor. 3 axles powered. Traction tires. A 72270 smoke generator can be installed in the locomotive. The triple LED headlights change over with the direction of travel. They and the smoke generator contact will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. The steam locomotive operating sounds and the sound of the locomotive's whistle, as well as the acceleration and braking delay can be controlled digitally with the 6021 Control Unit or with Märklin Systems. The sound of air compressors, a bell, the sound of coal being shoveled, and the sound of steam being let off can be controlled with Märklin Systems. Two other sound functions (brakes squealing and the grate being shaken) can be controlled with a 60212 Central Station. The headlights are maintenance-free, warm white LED's. Brake hose details parts are included with the locomotive. Length over the buffers 14.3 cm / 5-5/8".

Highlights:
Locomotive chiefly constructed of metal.
Completely new tooling.
New compact design Softdrive Sinus propulsion.
mfx decoder.
A variety of operating and sound functions can be controlled.

The Class 64 – The "Bubikopf" as a Jack-of-all-Trades (almost). Between 1928 and 1940, many famous locomotive builders in Germany participated in creating the class 64. As part of the standard design program for the German State Railroad Company, the class 64 was also closely related to other locomotive classes, in particular the class 24, which supplied the boiler and the frame for the driving wheels. A total of 520 units were built of this 12.4 meter / 40 foot 8-3/16 inch long standard design passenger tank locomotive with a 2-6-2T wheel arrangement. Due to its lower axle load and maximum speed of 90 km/h / 56 mph, it could be used on almost all routes, and its successful design allowed a broad range of applications. Its home base was passenger train service, but lightweight fast passenger trains and many a freight train were also among its tasks, which it mastered with bravura. World War II and the division of Germany left behind deep traces in the case of the class 64. The German Federal Railroad acquired 278 locomotives; 115 went to the German State Railroad of East Germany and one locomotive remained in Austria. Like many other classes, the class 64 also acquired a nickname. A modern lady's hairstyle of the time (bobbed hair) was the inspiration for this sturdy, compact locomotive. To what extent this was flattering to the world of women or to the profession of hairstylists is debatable, but to the German Federal Railroad the class 64 was a reliable partner for crews and passengers right up to its retirement in 1974. The museum locomotives that have been preserved enjoy endless popularity.

Price: $379.00

 

 

Märklin H0: 39641 Tank Locomotive

Prototype: Austrian Federal Railways (ÖBB) class 64 steam locomotive. The locomotive looks as it did in Era III, around 1956. Version with riveted water tanks.

Model: The locomotive has an mfx digital decoder, controlled Softdrive Sine high-efficiency propulsion, and a sound effects generator. It also has a compact design, maintenance-free motor. 3 axles powered. Traction tires. A 72270 smoke generator can be installed in the locomotive. The dual LED headlights change over with the direction of travel. They and the smoke generator contact will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. The steam locomotive operating sounds and the sound of the locomotive's whistle, as well as the acceleration and braking delay can be controlled digitally with the 6021 Control Unit or with Märklin Systems. The sound of air compressors, a short whistle blast, the sound of coal being shoveled, and the sound of steam being let off can be controlled with Märklin Systems. Two other sound functions (brakes squealing and the grate being shaken) can be controlled with a 60212 Central Station. The headlights are maintenance-free, warm white LED's. Brake hose details parts are included with the locomotive. Length over the buffers 14.3 cm / 5-5/8".

Highlights:
Locomotive chiefly constructed of metal.
Completely new tooling.
New compact design Softdrive Sinus propulsion.
mfx decoder.
A variety of operating and sound functions can be controlled.
One-time series.

The Class 64 – The "Bubikopf" as a Jack-of-all-Trades (almost). Between 1928 and 1940, many famous locomotive builders in Germany participated in creating the class 64. As part of the standard design program for the German State Railroad Company, the class 64 was also closely related to other locomotive classes, in particular the class 24, which supplied the boiler and the frame for the driving wheels. A total of 520 units were built of this 12.4 meter / 40 foot 8-3/16 inch long standard design passenger tank locomotive with a 2-6-2T wheel arrangement. Due to its lower axle load and maximum speed of 90 km/h / 56 mph, it could be used on almost all routes, and its successful design allowed a broad range of applications. Its home base was passenger train service, but lightweight fast passenger trains and many a freight train were also among its tasks, which it mastered with bravura. World War II and the division of Germany left behind deep traces in the case of the class 64. The German Federal Railroad acquired 278 locomotives; 115 went to the German State Railroad of East Germany and one locomotive remained in Austria. Like many other classes, the class 64 also acquired a nickname. A modern lady's hairstyle of the time (bobbed hair) was the inspiration for this sturdy, compact locomotive. To what extent this was flattering to the world of women or to the profession of hairstylists is debatable, but to the German Federal Railroad the class 64 was a reliable partner for crews and passengers right up to its retirement in 1974. The museum locomotives that have been preserved enjoy endless popularity.

Price: $375.00

 

 

Märklin H0: 39645 Tank Locomotive

Prototype: German Federal Railroad (DB) class 64 steam locomotive. The locomotive looks as it did around 1961/62.

Model: The locomotive has an mfx digital decoder, controlled high-efficiency propulsion, and Softdrive Sine. It also has a compact design, maintenance-free motor. 3 axles powered. Traction tires. A 72270 smoke generator can be installed in the locomotive. The triple LED headlights change over with the direction of travel. They and the smoke generator contact will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. The acceleration and braking delay can be controlled digitally with a 6021 Control Unit or with Märklin Systems. The locomotive has a different road number from that for item no. 39640. Brake hose details parts are included with the locomotive. Length over the buffers 14.3 cm / 5-5/8".

Highlights:
Locomotive chiefly constructed of metal.
Completely new tooling.
New compact design Softdrive Sinus propulsion.
mfx decoder.
Different road number than that for item no. 39460.
One-time series.

The Class 64 – The "Bubikopf" as a Jack-of-all-Trades (almost). Between 1928 and 1940, many famous locomotive builders in Germany participated in creating the class 64. As part of the standard design program for the German State Railroad Company, the class 64 was also closely related to other locomotive classes, in particular the class 24, which supplied the boiler and the frame for the driving wheels. A total of 520 units were built of this 12.4 meter / 40 foot 8-3/16 inch long standard design passenger tank locomotive with a 2-6-2T wheel arrangement. Due to its lower axle load and maximum speed of 90 km/h / 56 mph, it could be used on almost all routes, and its successful design allowed a broad range of applications. Its home base was passenger train service, but lightweight fast passenger trains and many a freight train were also among its tasks, which it mastered with bravura. World War II and the division of Germany left behind deep traces in the case of the class 64. The German Federal Railroad acquired 278 locomotives; 115 went to the German State Railroad of East Germany and one locomotive remained in Austria. Like many other classes, the class 64 also acquired a nickname. A modern lady's hairstyle of the time (bobbed hair) was the inspiration for this sturdy, compact locomotive. To what extent this was flattering to the world of women or to the profession of hairstylists is debatable, but to the German Federal Railroad the class 64 was a reliable partner for crews and passengers right up to its retirement in 1974. The museum locomotives that have been preserved enjoy endless popularity.

Price: $319.00