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Märklin 2008 New Items: H0 Electric Engines

Prices do not include shipping from ToToTrains to you. Applicable taxes apply.

ToToTrains is not liable for typo's, or any change in price or delivery due to the manufacturers decision(s).

Prices are good through February 28, 2008 only!



Märklin H0: 36331 Electric Locomotive

Prototype: Swiss Federal Railways (SBB/CFF/FFS) class Ee 3/3 switch engine. 0-6-0 wheel arrangement. Built in a series starting in 1932. Winterthur side rod drive.

Model: The locomotive has an mfx digital decoder and a miniature can motor with a flywheel. 3 axles and a jack shaft powered. The headlights are LED's built into the end platforms. The headlights will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. The acceleration and braking delay can be controlled digitally with a 6021 Control Unit. The roof equipment is separately applied. The locomotive has separately applied metal grab irons. Brake hoses and prototypical couplers can be installed on the buffer beam. Length over the buffers 11.2 cm / 4-7/16".

This model can be found in a DC version in the Trix H0 assortment under item no. 22335.

Price: $250.00

 

 

Märklin H0: 36838 Electric Locomotive

Prototype: "Veolia Transport" class 185 general-purpose locomotive. Dual system locomotive.

Model: The locomotive is constructed of metal with many cast-in details. The total design of the locomotive is ideal for model railroad operation. It has a digital decoder and a special can motor. 4 axles powered through cardan shafts. 2 traction tires. The triple headlights are maintenance-free LED's, they change over with the direction of travel, will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. The acceleration and braking delay can be controlled with a 6021 Control Unit or Märklin Systems. The locomotive has 2 pantographs that can be raised and lowered manually (they are not wired to take power from the catenary). Length over the buffers 21.7 cm / 8-9/16".

This model can be found in a DC version in the Trix H0 assortment under item no. 22076.

Price: $169.00

 

 

Märklin H0: 37122 Electric Locomotive

Prototype: Class 1200 heavy general-purpose locomotive. The locomotive is in the basic blue paint scheme with yellow stripes for the privately owned railroad ACTS, used on the Dutch State Railways (NS).

Model: The locomotive has an mfx digital decoder, controlled high-efficiency propulsion, and a sound effects generator. 2 axles powered. 4 traction tires. The headlights are maintenance-free, warm white LED's; the marker lights are LED's. They will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. The horn sound effect as well as the acceleration and braking delay can be controlled digitally with a 6021 Control Unit or with Märklin Systems. Brake hoses can be mounted on the buffer beam. Length over the buffers 20.8 cm / 8-3/16".

One-time series.

This model can be found in a DC version in the Trix H0 assortment under item no. 22149.

Price: $419.00

 

 

Märklin H0: 37238 Electric Locomotive

Prototype: Belgian State Railways (NMBS/SNCB) class 25.5 general-purpose locomotive. Version with five lights at the ends and only one pantograph.

Model: The locomotive is the rebuilt version with prototypical design side cooling grills, the appropriate roof details, and motive power specifications. The locomotive has an mfx digital decoder, controlled high-efficiency propulsion, and auxiliary functions. The headlights and marker lights will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. The red marker lights, the horn sound, and the acceleration and braking delay can be controlled digitally with a 6021 Control Unit or with Märklin Systems. 2 axles powered. Traction tires. The headlights are warm white LED's. The engineer's cabs have interior details. The locomotive has separately applied metal grab irons and other details. The couplers can be replaced by end skirting. Length over the buffers 21.0 cm / 8-1/4".

Highlights:
Prototypical changes to the body.
New design with one single-arm pantograph.
Warm white LED's for headlights.

This model can be found in a DC version in the Trix H0 assortment under item no. 22357.

Price: $355.00

 

 

Märklin H0: 37539 Electric Locomotive

Prototype: German Federal Railroad (DB) class 120.1 general-purpose locomotive. Regular production version.

Model: The locomotive has an mfx digital decoder, controlled high-efficiency propulsion, sound and light functions. 2 axles powered. 4 traction tires. The headlights are maintenance-free, warm white LED's. They will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. The cab lighting, whistle sound, station announcements, and the acceleration and braking delay can be controlled digitally with a 6021 Control Unit or with Märklin Systems. The engineer's cabs have interior details. The locomotive has separately applied grab irons. Length over the buffers 22.1 cm / 8-11/16".

Highlights:
Newly developed metal body.
Engineer's cabs with interior details and lighting.
All of the lights are maintenance-free, warm white LED's.
Digital sound: locomotive whistle and station announcements.

The Three-Phase Pioneer. The class 120 marked the technological breakthrough to three-phase current propulsion systems. This principle carried with it the promise of compact, largely non-wearing motors without commutators, wear rings, brushes, and mechanical contacts. Because a broad range of torque and speed could be mastered with three-phase current technology, the performance specifications for this new development were formulated rather like a long wish list. The class 120 was intended to pull 200 km/h / 125 mph fast InterCity trains and 5,400 metric ton freight trains, and was also to be equipped with push/pull controls and electric regenerative brakes. In 1977, the DB ordered five experimental units that were exhaustively probed on test stands, during test runs, and in operational use. Startup, tractive effort, acceleration, running characteristics, braking performance, power requirements, and stability under a load were part of the program. Comparison tests with other makes of locomotives as well as start-up tests on the Lötschberg and Semmering grades confirmed the performance capabilities of the technology. The speed record was 265 km/h / 166 mph. New developments flowed in during the experimental phases such as microprocessors for faster control and monitoring. Components were improved again and again until all five units were brought to the same technical level in 1982 and were pronounced ready for regular production. During the development phase of several years the procurement policy changed. Instead of all-round locomotives, special locomotives were again preferred on the basis of common development platforms with many parts identical in construction. Only a first production run of 60 units of the class 120 was purchased. The prototypes continue to be used for test purposes, and the regular production locomotives prove themselves in daily operation.

Price: $339.00

 

 

Märklin H0: 39191 Electric Locomotive

Prototype: German Federal Railroad (DB) class 119 in a blue paint scheme with older design lamps. The locomotive looks as it did at the beginning of the Seventies.

Model: The locomotive has an mfx decoder and controlled Softdrive Sine high-efficiency propulsion. It also has a maintenance-free, compact design motor. 2 axles powered. 4 traction tires. The engineer’s cabs and engine room have interior details. The locomotive body has many separately applied details. The locomotive comes in Era IV paint and lettering with large older design headlights and older design pantographs. The locomotive has a finely detailed frame and running gear with a realistic reproduction of the quill drive driving wheels. The headlights will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. The locomotive whistle sound and the acceleration and braking delay can be controlled digitally with a 6021 Control Unit or Märklin Systems. Length over the buffers 19.5 cm / 7-11/16".

Highlights:
Metal construction.
New compact-design Softdrive Sine high-efficiency propulsion.
mfx decoder with a locomotive whistle sound.
Older design pantographs.
Older design headlights.
Many separately applied details.

Price: $379.00

 

 

Märklin H0: 39342 Electric Locomotive

Prototype: German Railroad, Inc./Railion (DB AG) class 152 fast general-purpose locomotive. Advertising design (combine harvester theme) for the firm CLAAS KGaA mbH in Harsewinkel near Osnabrück, Germany.

Model: The locomotive has an mfx digital decoder, Softdrive Sine high-efficiency propulsion, and a sound effects generator. It also has a maintenance-free, compact design motor. 2 axles powered. Traction tires. The headlights are maintenance-free, warm white LED's and the marker lights are red LED's. The headlights and marker lights will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. The additional long-distance headlights, the sound of the horn, and the acceleration and braking delay can be controlled digitally with the 6021 Control Unit or with Märklin Systems. The engineer’s cabs have interior details. The locomotive has separately applied metal grab irons. Length over the buffers 22.5 cm / 8-7/8".

Highlights:
Metal construction.
mfx decoder.
Compact design Softdrive Sine high-efficiency propulsion.
Lighting with white and red LED's.
One-time series.

Price: $349.00

 

 

Märklin H0: 39410 Electric Locomotive

Prototype: German Federal Railroad (DB) class E 41. B-B wheel arrangement. Locomotive as it looked in Era III with 5 lamps, rounded cooling grills with vertical fins and a continuous rain gutter.

Model: The locomotive has an mfx digital decoder and the new controlled, compact design Softdrive Sine high-efficiency propulsion. 4 axles powered. 2 traction tires. The locomotive has separately applied metal grab irons. The engineer's cabs have interior details. There are separately applied roof walks. The triple headlights are maintenance-free, warm white LED's and the dual red marker lights are maintenance-free LED's. They change over with the direction of travel, will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. The electric locomotive operating sounds with the "firecracker" sound, the lights at the ends of the locomotive, and the acceleration and braking delay can be controlled digitally with the 6021 Control Unit or with Märklin Systems. The whistle sound and the sound of squealing brakes can be controlled digitally with Märklin Systems. The buffer beams are well detailed. The locomotive has NEM coupler pockets and a close coupler mechanism. Length over the buffers 18.0 cm / 7-1/16".

Highlights:
Completely new tooling for the popular class E 41.
Highly detailed metal body correct for the era.
Headlights with warm white LED's.
Softdrive Sine high-efficiency propulsion.
Realistic electric locomotive sound.

Class E 41 – The Firecracker of the German Federal Railroad. In 1950, the German Federal Railroad decided to go ahead with the urgent modernization of its motive power with the purchase of electric locomotives with predominantly standardized components and contracted with all of the important locomotive builders to come up with appropriate suggestions. The goal was a locomotive for freight service in order to relieve the E 94 and a general-purpose locomotive such as was known with the well proven E 44. Another requirement to the builders concerned the engineer's cabs: For the first time the engineer was to do his work seated, which meant an immense improvement for engineers. The result of this request for bids was five experimental locomotives for the class E 10.0. However, exhaustive tests soon revealed that two prototypes would not be suitable for the expected tasks. Officials at the German Federal Railroad therefore decided to have Siemens/Krauss Maffei develop an express locomotive and a freight locomotive, the classes E10 and E 40, AEG/Krupp to develop a heavy freight locomotive, the class E 50, and BBC/Henschel to develop a commuter locomotive, the class E 41. A total of 451 class E 41 locomotives were purchased between 1956 and 1971. For several decades they left their stamp on more than just the commuter service from the Bavarian Alps to the German coast. This successful design can be considered as a general-purpose locomotive, since it was used as motive power for practically every kind of train service during its long service life. It did not last long in the rigorous S-Bahn service, because it did not have electric brakes required for it. Its traditional task remained commuter service, in particular in push/pull operation with "Silberlinge / Silver Coins" commuter cars. Due to the required low axle load distributed over 2 two-axle trucks, the E 41 could be used with no problem on electrified branch lines. The 4 traction motors on the locomotive represented a further development of the ET 30, and the Siemens-Schuckert Plant / SSW was responsible for the drive gear. They equipped the E 41 like the other standard design locomotives with a rubber ring drive gear system. The oil-cooled transformer was equipped with a relay layout on the low voltage side, which was the source of a characteristic noise on the class E 41. This locomotive soon picked up its nicknames "Champagne Cork" or "Firecracker" on the German Federal Railroad. More than a few railroad passengers, upon hearing this sound, thought the locomotive was damaged and were more or less irritated about it. The maximum speed for this 15.62 meter / 51 foot 3 inch long locomotive was 120 km/h / 75 mph. When the German Federal Railroad raised the maximum speed for express trains at the end off the Fifties to 140 km/h / 88 mph, E 41 locomotives coming after that were only painted in green, since the elegant blue was reserved only for fast locomotives in long distance service. During its entire service life, the class E 41, from 1968 on the "141", had double-arm pantographs. Otherwise, it changed externally as the result of rebuilding and ran in Germany from the Alps to the North with three or five lights at each end, with or without rain gutters, with rounded or square cooling vents and in the color schemes that changed over time. The train safety systems were also adapted along the way and the "firecracker" was considered a proven, reliable design right up to the end of its service. At the start of the Nineties, the class 141 was being increasingly replaced by the class 143, and its roster decreased more due to the switch to powered rail cars for commuter service. The official farewell to the class 141 took place in February of 2006 in Braunschweig, but the last operating district for several locomotives was Frankfurt/Main, where they did not leave active service on the German Railroad, Inc. until the end of 2006. Several of these popular locomotives have remained preserved and you can still hear the "Firecracker" of the German Federal Railroad at least on museum runs.

The class E 41 is the perfect push/pull locomotive to go with the "Silberlinge / Silver Coins" commuter cars that are also coming out in 2008 as new tooling.

This model can be found in a DC version in the Trix H0 assortment under item no. 22140.

Price: $329.00

 

 

Märklin H0: 39411 Electric Locomotive

Prototype: German Federal Railroad (DB) class 141. B-B wheel arrangement. Locomotive as it looked in Era V with 3 lamps, Klatte cooling grills, and without a continuous rain gutter.

Model: The locomotive has an mfx digital decoder and the new controlled, compact design Softdrive Sine high-efficiency propulsion. 4 axles powered. 2 traction tires. The locomotive has separately applied metal grab irons. The engineer's cabs have interior details. There are separately applied roof walks. The triple headlights are maintenance-free, warm white LED's and the dual red marker lights are maintenance-free LED's. They change over with the direction of travel, will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. The electric locomotive operating sounds with the "firecracker" sound, the lights at the ends of the locomotive, and the acceleration and braking delay can be controlled digitally with the 6021 Control Unit or with Märklin Systems. The whistle sound and the sound of squealing brakes can be controlled digitally with Märklin Systems. The buffer beams are well detailed. The locomotive has NEM coupler pockets and a close coupler mechanism. Length over the buffers 18.0 cm / 7-1/16".

Highlights:
Completely new tooling for the popular class 141.
Highly detailed metal body correct for the era.
Headlights with warm white LED's.
Softdrive Sine high-efficiency propulsion.
Realistic electric locomotive sound.

Class E 41 – The Firecracker of the German Federal Railroad. In 1950, the German Federal Railroad decided to go ahead with the urgent modernization of its motive power with the purchase of electric locomotives with predominantly standardized components and contracted with all of the important locomotive builders to come up with appropriate suggestions. The goal was a locomotive for freight service in order to relieve the E 94 and a general-purpose locomotive such as was known with the well proven E 44. Another requirement to the builders concerned the engineer's cabs: For the first time the engineer was to do his work seated, which meant an immense improvement for engineers. The result of this request for bids was five experimental locomotives for the class E 10.0. However, exhaustive tests soon revealed that two prototypes would not be suitable for the expected tasks. Officials at the German Federal Railroad therefore decided to have Siemens/Krauss Maffei develop an express locomotive and a freight locomotive, the classes E10 and E 40, AEG/Krupp to develop a heavy freight locomotive, the class E 50, and BBC/Henschel to develop a commuter locomotive, the class E 41. A total of 451 class E 41 locomotives were purchased between 1956 and 1971. For several decades they left their stamp on more than just the commuter service from the Bavarian Alps to the German coast. This successful design can be considered as a general-purpose locomotive, since it was used as motive power for practically every kind of train service during its long service life. It did not last long in the rigorous S-Bahn service, because it did not have electric brakes required for it. Its traditional task remained commuter service, in particular in push/pull operation with "Silberlinge / Silver Coins" commuter cars. Due to the required low axle load distributed over 2 two-axle trucks, the E 41 could be used with no problem on electrified branch lines. The 4 traction motors on the locomotive represented a further development of the ET 30, and the Siemens-Schuckert Plant / SSW was responsible for the drive gear. They equipped the E 41 like the other standard design locomotives with a rubber ring drive gear system. The oil-cooled transformer was equipped with a relay layout on the low voltage side, which was the source of a characteristic noise on the class E 41. This locomotive soon picked up its nicknames "Champagne Cork" or "Firecracker" on the German Federal Railroad. More than a few railroad passengers, upon hearing this sound, thought the locomotive was damaged and were more or less irritated about it. The maximum speed for this 15.62 meter / 51 foot 3 inch long locomotive was 120 km/h / 75 mph. When the German Federal Railroad raised the maximum speed for express trains at the end off the Fifties to 140 km/h / 88 mph, E 41 locomotives coming after that were only painted in green, since the elegant blue was reserved only for fast locomotives in long distance service. During its entire service life, the class E 41, from 1968 on the "141", had double-arm pantographs. Otherwise, it changed externally as the result of rebuilding and ran in Germany from the Alps to the North with three or five lights at each end, with or without rain gutters, with rounded or square cooling vents and in the color schemes that changed over time. The train safety systems were also adapted along the way and the "firecracker" was considered a proven, reliable design right up to the end of its service. At the start of the Nineties, the class 141 was being increasingly replaced by the class 143, and its roster decreased more due to the switch to powered rail cars for commuter service. The official farewell to the class 141 took place in February of 2006 in Braunschweig, but the last operating district for several locomotives was Frankfurt/Main, where they did not leave active service on the German Railroad, Inc. until the end of 2006. Several of these popular locomotives have remained preserved and you can still hear the "Firecracker" of the German Federal Railroad at least on museum runs.

The class 141 is the perfect push/pull locomotive to go with the "Silberlinge / Silver Coins" commuter cars that are also coming out in 2008 as new tooling.

This model can be found in a DC version in the Trix H0 assortment under item no. 22141.

Price: $329.00

 

 


Märklin H0: 39421 Electric Locomotive

Prototype: Swiss Federal Railways (SBB/CFF/FFS) class Re 4/4 I electric locomotive. Non-rebuilt version with a red paint scheme. The locomotive looks as it did at the end of the Eighties.

Model: The locomotive has an mfx decoder and controlled Softdrive Sine high-efficiency propulsion. It also has a compact design, powerful motor. All 4 axles powered. 2 traction tires. The locomotive has separately applied roof details. The separately applied grab irons are made of metal. The locomotive has a representation of the crossover plates and grab irons at the ends. The Swiss headlight / marker light code (triple headlights / white marker light) changes over with the direction of travel, will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. Warm white LED's are used for the lights. The locomotive whistle sound and station announcements as well as the direct control (acceleration and braking delay) can be controlled with a 6021 Control Unit or with Märklin Systems. Length over the buffers 17.1 cm / 6-3/4".

This model can be found in a DC version in the Trix H0 assortment under item no. 22353.

Price: $359.00

 

 

Märklin H0: 39501

Prototype: German Federal Railroad (DB) class 150 heavy freight locomotive. The largest type of the standard design electric locomotives from the new construction program of the Fifties. Rebuilt version with double lamps and without a rain gutter. The locomotive looks as it did at the end of the Eighties.

Model: The locomotive has an mfx digital decoder, controlled Softdrive Sine high-efficiency propulsion, and a sound generator. The locomotive has a centrally-mounted, compact-design, maintenance-free motor with a flywheel. 4 axles powered through cardan shafts. 2 traction tires. The headlights are maintenance-free, warm white LED's, and the marker lights are maintenance-free LED's. They will work in conventional operation, and can be controlled digitally. The red marker lights can be turned off separately in digital operation. The electric locomotive blower motor sound, the horn sound, and the acceleration and braking delay can be controlled with a 6021 Control Unit or with Märklin Systems. The locomotive has separately applied metal grab irons on the sides and ends. The engineer's cabs and the engine room have interior details in relief. Length over the buffers 22.4 cm / 8-13/16".

Highlights:
Rebuilt version without rain gutters.
Maintenance-free, warm white LED's for headlights.
Lights at the ends of the locomotive can be turned off in digital operation.

This model can be found in a DC version in the Trix H0 assortment under item no. 22151.

Price: $349.00

 

 

Märklin H0: 39836 Electric Locomotive

Prototype: Fast multiple-system electric locomotive for cross-border passenger and freight service. Austrian Federal Railways (ÖBB) class 1216.

Model: The locomotive has an mfx digital decoder, controlled Softdrive Sine high-efficiency propulsion, a compact design, maintenance-free motor, and a sound effects generator. 2 axles powered. 4 traction tires. The headlights are maintenance-free, warm white LED's, and the marker lights are maintenance-free LED's. The headlights and marker lights will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. The marker lights can be turned off separately. They along with the long distance headlights, and the sound of a horn, as well as the acceleration and braking delay can be controlled digitally with the 6021 Control Unit or with Märklin Systems. Additional operating sounds, the main relay, and compressed air sounds can be controlled digitally with Märklin Systems. The engineer's cabs have interior details. The locomotive has separately applied metal grab irons. Length over the buffers 22.5 cm / 8-7/8".

Highlights:
New tooling.
Metal construction.

The Class 1216 – Third Generation Alpine Bull. In the wake of the new political order in Europe, the transportation routes once again are going straight through the Alpine republic of Austria into the center of the continent. The Austrian Federal Railways could not and have not wanted to miss this connection and have prescribed themselves and their motive power roster a radical rejuvenating cure. In addition to a new design for the infrastructure, at present one of the largest and architecturally most spectacular train stations in Europe is being built, the locomotives and rolling stock have either been upgraded or newly purchased. The best known and most beautiful new development in terms of its shape is the "Taurus" locomotive family built by Siemens, the classes 1016, 1116, and 1216. The rollout of the 3rd generation of the class 1216 Alpine Bull took place on March 31, 2005 at the Siemens plant in Munich. A total of 50 locomotives were ordered by the ÖBB and are to be used mainly in cross-border passenger and freight service. This four-system, three-phase current, general-purpose locomotive was derived largely from the Siemens ES 64 U4, designated on the German Railroad, Inc. as the class 189. Externally, the Taurus family genes are very much handed down. In terms of design, there have been several changes however such as four doors, a fairing for the costly roof equipment, LED lighting, and the upper front light now placed under the windshield. This four-motor locomotive is something over 19 meters / 62 feet 4-1/6 inches long, reaches a maximum speed of 230 km/h / 144 mph and has an axle load of 21.8 metric tons. Even before its time as the ÖBB bull, road no. 1216 050 broke the world record for conventional locomotives set by the SNCF's road no. BB 9004 in 1955 at 331 km/h / 207 mph. This was done on September 2, 2006 on the Nürnberg-Ingolstadt new construction route between Kinding and Allersberg. Road no. 1216 050 ran, without extensive preparation to the track, catenary, or the locomotive, at a speed of 344 km/h / 215 mph and even reached 357 km/h / 223 mph during a second test run. At the end of 2007 it was transferred like the other 49 class 1216 locomotives to the ÖBB and it will serve primarily in runs from Austria to Slovenia and Italy. The 1216 will come to Germany and Hungary as part of the new ÖBB product "Railjet" and will link Vienna with Munich and Budapest on a regular schedule. The fast, powerful bulls of the 3rd generation cut a good figure in the immense, futuristic halls of the new Vienna Main Station and out on the line.

Price: $375.00

 

 

Märklin H0: 39892 Electric Locomotive

Prototype: Siemens Dispolok, Inc. class ES 64 F4 fast general-purpose locomotive, leased to the Austrian Federal Railways (ÖBB). Multiple-system locomotive with 4 pantographs. Use: Cross-border fast passenger and freight service.

Model: The locomotive has an mfx digital decoder, controlled Softdrive Sine high-efficiency propulsion, a compact design, maintenance-free motor, and a sound effects generator. 2 axles powered. 4 traction tires. The headlights are maintenance-free, warm white LED's, and the marker lights are maintenance-free LED's. The headlights and marker lights will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. The long distance headlights, and the sound of a horn, as well as the acceleration and braking delay can be controlled digitally with the 6021 Control Unit or with Märklin Systems. The engineer's cabs have interior details. The locomotive has separately applied metal grab irons. Length over the buffers 22.5 cm / 8-7/8".

One-time series.

Price: $349.00

 

 

Märklin H0: 39893 Electric Locomotive

Prototype: Swiss Federal Railways (SBB/CFF/FFS) class 474 fast general-purpose locomotive. Multiple-system locomotive with 4 pantographs. Use: Cross-border fast freight service.

Model: The locomotive has an mfx digital decoder, controlled Softdrive Sine high-efficiency propulsion, a compact design, maintenance-free motor, and a sound effects generator. 2 axles powered. 4 traction tires. The headlights are maintenance-free, warm white LED's. The headlights and marker lights will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. The long distance headlights, and the sound of a horn, as well as the acceleration and braking delay can be controlled digitally with the 6021 Control Unit or with Märklin Systems. The engineer's cabs have interior details. The locomotive has separately applied metal grab irons. Length over the buffers 22.5 cm / 8-7/8".

Price: $349.00

 

 

Märklin H0: 39894 Electric Locomotive

Prototype: Class 441 fast general-purpose locomotive painted and lettered for the Swedish railroad company Hector-Rail. Multiple-system locomotive with 2 pantographs. Use: Cross-border fast freight service.

Model: The locomotive has an mfx digital decoder, controlled Softdrive Sine high-efficiency propulsion, a compact design, maintenance-free motor, and a sound effects generator. 2 axles powered. 4 traction tires. The headlights are maintenance-free, warm white LED's. The headlights will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. The marker lights can be turned off separately. They along with the long distance headlights, and the sound of a horn, as well as the acceleration and braking delay can be controlled digitally with the 6021 Control Unit or with Märklin Systems. The engineer's cabs have interior details. The locomotive has separately applied metal grab irons. Length over the buffers 22.5 cm / 8-7/8".

One-time series.

Price: $369.00