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Märklin 2006 New Items: 1 Gauge

 

Following are the new 2006 1-Gauge items announced by Märklin.

Prices do not include shipping from ToToTrains to you. Applicable taxes apply.

Prices good through March 15, 2006.

ToToTrains is not liable for typo's, or any change in price or delivery due to the manufacturers decision(s).

 

Märklin 16075: Reproduction Rail Zeppelin
Prototype: Propeller driven Kruckenberg Rail Zeppelin. Unit as it looked in 1931 on the German State Railroad Company (DRG). Era II.
Model: Reproduction of the two-axle Märklin I Gauge model of 1930. In appearance it looks like the historic Märklin-model, but it is technically updated in construction. It can be run on current 1 Gauge two-rail track (cannot be run on three-rail track). Built-in digital decoder for operation with DC power, AC power, Märklin Digital, or Märklin Systems. One axle powered from a current 1 Gauge motor. Powered propeller on the rear of the unit. Built-in interior lighting as well as dual headlights and a red marker light, both with incandescent light bulbs. These lights are on all of the time. The body and frame of this Rail Zeppelin reproduction are prototypically made of metal with finer details imprinted on the metal. Minimum radius for operation 1,020 mm / 40-3/16”. Rail Zeppelin length approximately 56 cm / 22-1/16”.
Highlights:
Reproduction close to the historic Märklin original in appearance.
Built-in digital decoder.
Powered propeller on the rear of the
One-time series.
Airplane Technology on Rails – In the 1920s, aeronautical engineer Franz Kruckenberg, born in Uetersen, Germany in 1882, had the vision of fast railroad passenger service with propeller-driven railroad cars. The plans developed by him were based on lightweight airplane technology and reached their peak on June 21, 1931 in a triumphant record run by his streamlined Rail Zeppelin. It reached 233 km/h / 146 mph, a speed record for powered railroad cars that stood for 23 years. The principle of propeller-driven railroad cars proved to be less than ideally suited in the course of test runs. Yet, Kruckenberg laid the foundation for modern, lightweight high speed rail cars with the Rail Zeppelin and axle-powered successor designs developed by him. The Rail Zeppelin was and still remains a legend and synonym for the rapid progress in railroad technology that has reached its peak in the present with the current high speed powered rail car train technology. It is very probable that the 1 Gauge model of the Rail Zeppelin introduced by Märklin shortly after the record run also contributed greatly to keeping the memory alive down to the present of this proponent of technology from the steam era, which was still growing at that time. The new Märklin metal model is an almost identical reproduction of the rare Rail Zeppelin collector’s model of 1931. A closer look at the new model will reveal that the third rail pickup shoe is missing, since the new model is designed for operation on current 1 Gauge two-rail track. In addition, it has a digital decoder and a current 1 Gauge motor.
Price: $979.00

Märklin 54425: ”My Start with Märklin” Starter Set. 230 Volts
Prototype: Class DH 360 diesel locomotive. 0-6-0 wheel arrangement with side rods.
Model: The set has a three-axle diesel locomotive in a simplified form with a built-in electronic circuit for operation with AC power or Märklin Delta/Digital/Systems. 1 low side car with red walls. 1 gondola with a blue body. Total train length over the buffers 83 cm / 32-11/16”. Minimum radius for operation 600 mm / 23-5/8”. Track included: 12 no. 5922 curved track, radius 600 mm / 23-5/8” - 2 no. 5903 straight track, length 300 mm / 11-13/16” - 1 each no. 5654 feeder wire set. Transformer: 230 volts / 32 VA, with smooth speed control and connections for electric accessories.
Almost all of the items from the Märklin 1 Gauge track, locomotive, car, and accessory assortment can be used to expand this 1 Gauge starter set.
Price: call

Märklin 55005: Steam Locomotive with a Tender, with Real Live Steam Operation
Prototype: Royal Bavarian State Railroad (K.Bay.Sts.B.) class S 3/6 in the green provincial railroad paint scheme of the prototype in Era I. 4-6-2 wheel arrangement, ”Pacific” design. Later the class 18.4.
Model: The locomotive’s frame and body are made of metal. The locomotive comes with a real steam boiler and a propulsion system by means of the cylinders and the drive rods and side rods on 3 wheel sets. The locomotive has a wireless remote control and smooth, controllable speed. The locomotive receiver is built into the tender, and the sender is included with the locomotive. The locomotive’s water boiler is fired with a refillable gas tank that uses gas for cigarette lighters available in most stores. The locomotive has a built-in safety valve and a manometer. Rechargeable batteries (AA size) are required for the locomotive receiver in the tender as well as for the sender in order to operate the remote control. These batteries do not come with the locomotive. Mininum radius for operation 1,020 mm / 40-3/16”. Length over the buffers 67.0 cm / 26-3/8”.
Important Notes: This locomotive may only be operated outdoors and only by adults. The locomotive boiler may never be fired up without a sufficient supply of water in it. Dirty track caused by residues of steam and oil cannot be avoided. Depending on the load, a full boiler of water allows you to run the locomotive from about 20 to 30 minutes. Cars with regular Märklin claw couplers can be coupled to the locomotive. This model can be used in most countries in Europe.
Price: call

Märklin 55137: Diesel Powered Express Rail Car
Prototype: German State Railroad Company (DRG) class SVT 137. Two-unit ”Hamburg” design with a Jacobs truck.
Model: The rail car comes with controlled high-efficiency propulsion. It has an mfx decoder with many light and sound functions as well as a powerful motor in the Jacobs truck. The rail car can be run on AC power, DC power, and Märklin Digital as well as Märklin Systems. 2 axles powered. The rail car has continuous side skirting with covers with side play over the wheel cutouts. The rail car has a coupling with a guide mechanism between the car halves. The rail car has headlights / marker lights and interior lighting with maintenance-free LED’s. The headlights / marker lights change over with the direction of travel and together with the engineer’s cab lighting will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. The interior lighting, horn, and the acceleration and braking delay can be controlled digitally with a 6021 Control Unit or Märklin Systems. The roofs have separately applied details. The rail car has reproductions (non-working) of Scharfenberg couplers at the ends. Minimum radius for operation 1,020 mm / 40-3/16”. Length over the couplers 140.4 cm / 55-1/4”.
Highlights:
Completely new tooling.
Model of the famous powered rail cars from the period of the "Flying Trains".
mfx decoder.
Sophisticated sound effects circuit with 2 speakers for reproduction of the two separate power systems in the prototype.
Prototypical propulsion system mounted on the central Jacobs truck.
Detailed interior details and interior lighting built in.
The 55137 diesel powered rail car is being produced in 2006 in a one-time series only for Insider members.
Fast and No Competition – In the 1920s the German State Railroad Company recognized the increasing competition from automobiles and airplanes. As far back as then business people in particularly and the wealthy appreciated fast day trips – mornings out, evenings back. The railroad did not want to lose these demanding customers. It therefore had to become faster with attractive offerings. The railroad awarded a contract for a two-unit combustion powered rail car after the success of promising high speed experiments with the propeller-driven Rail Zeppelin, which had reached a sensational 230 km/h / 144 mph on its world record run in June of 1931 as a ”technology front runner”. The powered rail car was placed into service in May of 1932 and linked the two urban areas of Berlin and Hamburg. This powered express rail car raced over the 228 km / 143 mile long route in 132 minutes. At an average speed of almost 128 km/h / 80 mph it was the fastest, regularly scheduled train in the world and entered history as the ”Flying Hamburger”. The success of this new express train service was overwhelming. The German State Railroad therefore awarded a contract for additional powered rail car trains. This Hamburg design is the prototype for the Märklin model. Improvements in design were made to the regular production VT 137 from the experience assembled with the ”Flying Hamburger”. In addition, these powered rail car trains were given particularly elegant, streamlined ends and multiple unit control for running two trains together. A power plant consisting of a 12 cylinder diesel motor and a generator was located over the two end trucks for the diesel-electric propulsion of the train. These power plants generated the current for the two electric axle-suspended traction motors on the axles of the center Jakobs truck. The DRG quickly expanded its express service network operated wit the SVT. These Hamburg design powered rail car trains ran from and to Berlin to Cologne, Frankfurt, Leipzig, Stuttgart, and Munich. There was also a direction connection between Hamburg and Cologne. The German State Railroad held class 03 streamlined locomotives in reserve to protect these routes. In the event of an SVT out of service these locomotives could jump into service with a three-car Schürzenwagen consist. The multiple unit control built into the regular production powered rail cars enabled the railroad to run a large part of the route from Berlin to Southern Germany initially with two powered rail cars coupled together. After being separated in Nürnberg the two powered rail car trains ran further individually to Stuttgart and Munich. Specially schooled train and station personnel performed the necessary uncoupling and coupling procedures very rapidly. After a one minute stop the first powered rail car could go on, followed by the second powered rail car a minute later. Both sets were coupled together again in Nürnberg on the return trip. This type of multiple unit operation can also be seen today – seven decades later – with the ICE 2.
Special sound effects that can be controlled with a Control Unit or Märklin Systems: Short horn blast and the conductor’s whistle. Special sound effects that can be controlled with Märklin Systems: Station platform announcements and the sound of doors being opened.
Price: TBA

Märklin 55562: Electric Freight Locomotive
Prototype: Swiss Federal Railways (SBB/CFF/FFS) class Ce 6/8 II. Brown version as the prototype looked in Era II.
Model: The locomotive comes with an mfx decoder with a multiple function sound generator. Controlled high-efficiency propulsion with 2 motors. 6 axles powered. This locomotive can be run with AC power, DC power, Märklin Digital, and Märklin Systems. The headlights, marker lights, and interior lighting are maintenance-free LED’s. The headlights / marker lights change over with the direction of travel, will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. The engineer’s cab lighting, electric locomotive operating sounds, horn, and the direct control (acceleration and braking delay) can be controlled with a Control Unit or Märklin Systems. The sounds of the locomotive being coupled to a train (buffers striking one another), compressed air leaking, station announcements in Swiss German, and the sound of brakes squealing can be controlled with Märklin Systems. Two additional sounds (blower motors and compressor) can be controlled with the Central Station. The locomotive has a three-part body with finely detailed running gear. The running gear has cast drive rods and side rods. There are two grab irons on each of the hoods as well as separately applied walkover plates. There are 4 doors that can be opened. The roofs have many separately applied details as well as 2 older design working pantographs. The buffer beams have the older design spring-loaded buffers. The reproduction prototype couplers installed at the factory can be replaced by 2 claw couplers included with the locomotive. Mininum radius for operation 1,020 mm / 40-3/16”. Length over the buffers 60.6 cm / 23-7/8”.
Highlights:
mfx decoder.
Controlled high-efficiency propulsion with 2 motors.
Multiple function sound effects circuit with 2 speakers.
Engineer’s cab interior details and lighting.
Swiss headlight / marker light changeover.
Special sound effects: station announcements in Swiss German, sounds of the locomotive coupling up to a train.
Famous for Steeply Graded Routes – In 1919 the Swiss Federal Railways had a suitable electric locomotive developed for the steeply graded Gotthard route. This locomotive impressed people from the outset with its appearance due to its extremely harmonious design for that time. A total of 51 units of this three-unit locomotive were built as the classes Ce 6/8 II (1919-22) and Ce 6/8 III (1926/27). A three-unit articulated design, with the centrally mounted locomotive body supported by the two long running gear frames, was selected for trouble-free operation on the narrow curves of the Gotthard route. Two traction motors per group of driving axles, working by means of a reduction gear through a common intermediate shaft, were selected for the propulsion system. Slotted side rods were used to transmit power to the 3 driving axles on each power truck. On the first production run, the Ce 6/8 II, the outer driving axles on each power truck were even powered by a separate ”A” frame. The motion of this complicated design in conjunction with the external appearance of the articulated construction quickly led to the nickname ”Crocodile”, with which these locomotives advanced to the ranks of the most famous locomotives in the world. The many years of operation for these locomotives under difficult conditions well into the 1980s proves the extraordinary luck of the designers and demonstrates the high degree of care in the construction and maintenance of these locomotives.
Price: $2050.00

Märklin 55892: Tank Locomotive
Prototype: German State Railroad (DRG) class 89.70-75. Former Prussian T3.
Model: The locomotive is constructed of metal with separately applied plastic details. The engineer’s cab has doors that can be opened. The locomotive has separately applied metal hand rails. It has controlled high-efficiency propulsion, a digital decoder, and a sound effects generator. It can be operated with AC power, DC power, Märklin Digital, and Märklin Systems. The locomotive has 3 axles powered and 2 traction tires. The dual headlights change over with the direction of travel, and they and the smoke generator will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. The smoke generator, whistle, and steam locomotive operating sounds as well as the direct control (acceleration / braking delay) can be controlled with a Control Unit or Märklin Systems. The branch line bell sounds as well as the air compressor and the sound of coal being shoveled can be controlled with Märklin Systems. Minimum radius for operation 1,020 mm / 40-3/16”. Length over the buffers 26.8 cm / 10-9/16”.
Highlights:
Locomotive constructed of metal.
Many separately applied details.
Better Known than Many Large Ones – Without a doubt the different versions of the Prussian class T3 are among the most popular German steam locomotives. The 1,345 units alone ordered by the Prussians were enough to constitute almost complete distribution of this lovely tank locomotive. In addition, many other state and private railroads also took delivery of well over 100 units of the T3. The T3 locomotives placed into service between 1881 and 1910 were initially used most often in branch line service; later they were concentrated mainly in switching work. After the end of their state railroad service, many of the T3 tank locomotives worked many more years on private railroads and on industrial railroad systems.
Price: $1031.00

Märklin 55941: Tank Locomotive
Prototype: German Federal Railroad (DB) class 94.5. Former Prussian T 16.1. Version with older design boiler and sand dome positioned towards the front as well as pre-heater on the top of the boiler. Riveted water tanks.
Model: The locomotive frame and body are chiefly made of metal. The locomotive comes with an mfx decoder, controlled high-efficiency propulsion, and a sound generator with many functions. The locomotive can be operated with AC power, DC power, Märklin Digital, and Märklin Systems. 5 axles powered, 2 traction tires. The locomotive has a built-in smoke generator. The triple headlights change over with the direction of power. The headlights and the smoke generator will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. The steam locomotive sounds, locomotive whistle, and Telex uncoupler function can be controlled with a Control Unit or Märklin Systems. Additional functions such as turning off the sound of squealing brakes, switching locomotive radio “chatter”, the locomotive’s bell as well as direct control (acceleration / braking delay) can be controlled with Märklin Systems. In addition, the sounds of injectors for boiler water, steam being released, the firebox grate being shaken, the sound of coal being shoveled, generator sounds, the sound of escaping compressed air, and the sound of couplers engaging can be activated with the Central Station. The locomotive has many separately applied details. The locomotive has Telex couplers at both ends. Minimum radius for operation 1,020 mm / 40-3/16”. Length over the buffers 39.5 cm / 15-9/16”.
Highlights:
New Tooling.
Controlled high-efficiency propulsion.
mfx decoder included.
Multiple function sound effects circuit included.
Sumptuous Motive Power – Approximately 1,236 units of the class 94.5 tank locomotive were built from 1914 to 1924, and they were originally placed into service as the Prussian T16.1. During the provincial railroad and German State Railroad periods they were the most powerful locomotives for steep grades and switching work where the maximum axle load was 17 metric tons. These units were also the most suitable motive power for branch lines. The T 16/1 turned out to be extremely multi-faceted, trouble-free locomotives almost immediately after being placed into service. In addition, the single-frame design with two-cylinder running gear required less maintenance expense than somewhat complicated Mallet designs. The DRG certainly thought about a new standard design locomotive in this class as a replacement for the T16, but the war stopped this planning approach. Later the DB developed the class 82 from this concept within the framework of the new postwar program of locomotive types. These units were not able however to establish themselves as expected. By contrast, the last T16 survived their successors by many years. Several units have remained preserved as museum pieces. In addition to the locomotives placed into service by Prussia, there were also numerous, different provincial railroad designs of the T16.
The sound effects generator is specifically made for this locomotive and enables you to activate the following special operating and surrounding sound effects: Switching operations cab chatter (with Märklin Systems) as well as the injector for boiler water, generator sounds, compressed air leaking, and the sound of couplers engaging (with the Central Station).
Price: $1973.00

Märklin 58123: Express Train Passenger Car
Prototype: Mitropa type WR4ü-39 ”Schürzenwagen” dining car. Görlitz type III design heavy trucks. Used on the German State Railroad (DRG).
Model: The car is a four-axle dining car with detailed interiors of the dining area, galley, and personnel compartment. The car has built-in interior lighting. The car roof has separately applied vents, T-formed galley stove pipe, and indentations for marker signal brackets. The car ends have diaphragms and ladders. The couplers are mounted in close coupler guide mechanisms. Minimum radius for operation 1,020 mm / 40-3/16”. Length over the buffers 73.4 cm / 28-7/8”.
Highlights:
New tooling.
Many separately applied details.
Interior details and interior lighting.
Dining in Style in Express Trains – Mitropa was responsible for the catering in trains during the DRG period and it had appropriate dining cars built to go with the DRG’s streamlined express train passenger cars. These cars were placed into service starting in 1939 and had a dining area with 42 seats divided into a smoking and non-smoking compartment. In addition, these cars had a galley with a coal-fired cook stove as well as a small personnel compartment. The trucks on the cars were ”Görlitz type III design” heavy trucks, and they provided pleasantly smooth running characteristics with their wheelbase of 3.60 meters / 11 feet 9-3/4 inches and four-point springing. These cars were adapted several times to changing requirements and were in service well into the German Federal Railroad period.
Price: $510.00

Märklin 58124: Express Train Passenger Car
Prototype: Mitropa type WL4ü-39 ”Schürzenwagen” sleeping car. Görlitz type III design heavy trucks. Used on the German State Railroad (DRG).
Model: The car is a four-axle sleeping car with detailed interiors of the sleeping compartments. The car has built-in interior lighting. The car roof has separately applied vents, and indentations for marker signal brackets. The car ends have diaphragms and ladders. The couplers are mounted in close coupler guide mechanisms. Minimum radius for operation 1,020 mm / 40-3/16”. Length over the buffers 73.4 cm / 28-7/8”.
Highlights:
New tooling.
Many separately applied details.
Interior details and interior lighting.
Softly Asleep and Swiftly to Your Destination – The sleeping and dining car operator Mitropa also had new sleeping cars built at the same time as the dining cars placed into service in the 1930s to go with the DRG’s ”Schürzenwagen” streamlined passenger cars. These cars also had the new Mitropa ”standard length” of 23.50 meters / 77 feet 1-3/16 inches and also were provided with the smooth running ”Görlitz type III design” heavy trucks. Passengers appreciated the high level of comfort in these cars. These cars therefore also ran well into the German Federal Railroad era.
Price: $510.00

Märklin 58133: Express Train Passenger Car
Prototype: Mitropa type WR4ü(e)-39 ”Schürzenwagen” dining car. Görlitz type III design heavy trucks. Used on the German Federal Railroad (DB).
Model: The car is a four-axle dining car with detailed interiors of the dining area, galley, and personnel compartment. The car has built-in interior lighting. The car roof has separately applied vents, T-formed galley stove pipe, and indentations for marker signal brackets. The windows for the galley have ventilation shutters. The car ends have diaphragms and ladders. The couplers are mounted in close coupler guide mechanisms. Minimum radius for operation 1,020 mm / 40-3/16”. Length over the buffers 73.4 cm / 28-7/8”.
Highlights:
New tooling.
Many separately applied details.
Interior details and interior lighting.
Dining Car Classics in German Federal Railroad Long Distance Service – Mitropa was once responsible for the catering in trains and had comfortable dining cars built for the DRG’s streamlined express train passenger cars (”Schürzenwagen”). These cars were placed into service starting in 1939 and had a dining area divided into a smoking and non-smoking compartment. The trucks on the cars were originally ”Görlitz type III design” heavy trucks, which provided a high level of riding comfort. These cars had a galley with a coal-fired cook stove when first placed into service. After World War II the stove was converted to oil firing. Later electric heating was installed and the trucks were replaced by Minden-Deutz designs. These cars were adapted several times to changing requirements and were in service well into the German Federal Railroad period.
These cars can be combined with the ”Schürzenwagen” models 58131, 58132, and 58134 to form a typical DB express train consist from early Era III.
Price: $510.00

Märklin 58134: Express Train Passenger Car
Prototype: Mitropa type WLAB4ü(e)-39 ”Schürzenwagen” sleeping car. Görlitz type III design heavy trucks. Used on the German Federal Railroad (DB).
Model: The car is a four-axle sleeping car with detailed interiors of the sleeping compartments. The car has built-in interior lighting. The car roof has separately applied vents, and indentations for marker signal brackets. The car ends have diaphragms and ladders. The couplers are mounted in close coupler guide mechanisms. Minimum radius for operation 1,020 mm / 40-3/16”. Length over the buffers 73.4 cm / 28-7/8”.
Highlights:
New tooling.
Many separately applied details.
Interior details and interior lighting.
Sound Asleep to Your Destination – The sleeping and dining car operator Mitropa also had new sleeping cars built at the same time as the dining cars placed into service in the 1930s to go with the DRG’s ”Schürzenwagen” streamlined passenger cars. These cars were also 23.50 meters / 77 feet 1-3/16 inches in length and also had with the smooth running ”Görlitz type III design” heavy trucks. These comfortable cars were also used after World War II and were gradually modernized. Among the latter steps was the installation of electric heating. These sleeping cars were always very popular with passengers. These cars were therefore also in service well into the German Federal Railroad era.
These cars can be combined with the ”Schürzenwagen” models 58131, 58132, and 58133 to form a typical DB express train consist from early Era III.
Price: $510.00